We The People

Our government is actually a collection of people operating fairly anonymously behind the cloak of that moniker. In their anonymity they act without direct responsibility or accountability to the citizens at large.
Thus, the anonymous can make decisions, influence policy and trade favors in order to effect their personal agenda. For the most part, they have collectively betrayed the trust and confidence of “we the people.” And the people are virtually powerless to stop the momentum of an increasingly intrusive government invading privacy, restricting rights and denying access.
The vote has become the child of the dollar, domestic and foreign, and is more readily influenced by those in power rather than the minority who actually vote. The open gates of immigration expose the country to undue influence on free enterprise, drain resources without corresponding contribution and expose national security to enormous risk. At the same time, many want to disarm the citizenry, increase police power and reduce the size of the military.
While the beliefs of Christianity are oppressed by any segment with a contrary belief system, a high school in Fort Collins Colorado recited the Pledge of Allegiance in Arabic and changed “God” to “Allah.”
The intelligence and enforcement communities have done a commendable job of detecting and deterring terrorist intrusions. But Boston happened. It will not be the last attempt. And likely, it will not be the last very unfortunate success.
The conclusion then would be that “we the people” are subject to attack from without, and within. As German citizens did long before WWII, it seems Americans, for the most part, have turned an apathetic eye. Chaos looms. The question then remains, “Who will rescue the most powerful nation when it falls?”

Sterling, Jordan and Obama

The media is ablaze with the comments allegedly made by Sterling in what seems to be a private conversation with his supposed girlfriend. What is almost certain is that there are no certainties in this gladitorium.

Before anyone gets into this argument,¬†ought it not to be established that these comments were in fact made in a private conversation? If that is the case, it begs the question as to why the conversations were recorded in the first place. Then it should be asked why they were released and by whom. And then the most glaring question, the one which ought to be of 1st importance to everyone … is what we say in private, if we have a reasonable expectation of privacy, ¬†something for which we can be legitimately prosecuted in either the kangaroo court of public opinion or the courts of the system?

Choices We Make

It is unfortunate that Disney chooses to effect the discrimination of which they condemn the BSA. It is that one, an individual or organization, cannot take a position without domino recrimination. If Disney can choose who or what they serve, then how is it a small business cannot do the same?